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69 2735 Doyle A Conan 1859 1930
69 2735 Doyle A Conan 1859 1930
69 2735 Doyle A Conan 1859 1930
69/2735 Doyle, A. Conan (1859-1930). Four AUTOGRAPH LETTERS SIGNED to Albert Kinross and an AUTOGRAPH POSTCARD SIGNED to Charles Kinross, all signed "A. Conan Doyle", all pen and ink, not dated (±1925) (postcard postmarked 7 October 1929), all letters recto only (1x recto and verso), postcard recto and verso (address), three letters w. printed letterhead "15, Buckingham Palace Mansions, S.W.1" (dated in autograph "Feb.20")/ "Windlesham, Crowburough, Sussex" (dated in autograph "Feb.28")/ "From Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, 15, Buckingham Palace Mansions, S.W.1", one letter with autograph heading "Bignell Wood Minstead July 17", postcard w. printed letterhead "Windlesham, Crowburough, Sussex".

= Two of the letters concern Albert Kinross's WW I novel God and Tony Hewitt (London, 1925), about which Conan Doyle says in the undated letter: "I wrote my keen appreciation of Tony Hewitt in the Author's Club. Perhaps it has now reached you (...)". He goes on to ask Kinross to read his "Land of Mist", the novel of Doyle wrote in the years after the death of his son Kingsley in WWI and which reflects his interest in the matter of life after death. "As we all have to die it is inconceivable that anyone should not be interested in what follows death (...) I hope that my ten years of unbroken work may have had some share in the change [referring to the "ridiculous misrepresentations, clerical, scientific, journalistic and God knows what"]." In the letter dated "July 17" Doyle also stresses his admiration for the novel and vents his anger at the modern "wretched critics who imagine always that if a thing is clear it must be shallow." The two letters that are dated "Feb. 20" and "Feb. 28" both refer to an unspecified occurrence not referable for us, in which someone was apparently offended by something that Doyle wrote: "I am sending a copy of the book in the Author's Club library. Please have a look at the passage - it is about Chap. III I think, and tell me frankly if you think that there is anything offensive. If it had been said of me it would have amused me. I wrote however to this ladys friend M. Nicholson (I think that's the man) and to Hamlin Garland [American author] saying I was sorry if I had unwittingly offended anyone (...)." (letter of February 20) and "(...) Of course I knew nothing of this Hospital. I have asked the American Publisher however to put a slip in to say that [...ley's (?)] friends do not accept that view. (...)." The postcard, addressed to Charles Kinross, finally, reads as follows: "Dear Sir, It is very safe in Chapman's hands. I dont think I could add anything. A. Conan Doyle." Possibly Charles Kinross, the author of The Ballad of John Dunn and Other Poems (1910). SEE ILLUSTRATION PLATE XCIX.

€ (1.500-2.500)